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"Hatred" is a genocide simulator developed by Neo-Nazis

fucknovideogames:

​Hatred" is an independent PC game by ​a group of Polish developers. In order to set it apart for promotional reasons, the developers have stated that they are committed to "pure gameplay", claiming that mass murder of civilians by an angry disenfranchised man is more "honest" or somehow free from political narrative, unlike other modern games.
imageHatred is not apolitical. In fact, the opposite is true - it’s a game about glorifying violent racism and white supremacy. Consider the game’s trailer, which conspicuously lingers on the white protagonist brutally murdering and mutilating people of color.
image
In this photo of the development team, we can see that one of the developers wears a shirt depicting a controversial anti-Communist military group. Though the  Żołnierze wyklęci guerilla movement is remembered as heroes by national institutions, they are also frequently lionized by right-wing politicians and activists in modern Poland.
image
Another team member, ‘CEO and Animator’ Jarosław Zieliński, has prominently displayed an endorsement on his public Facebook page of the Polska Liga Obrony: an established nationalist Islamophobic, anti-immigration hate group. Gameplay designer Jakub Stychno is a supporter of the fascistic Obóz Narodowo Radykalny, as well as the homophobic, nationalistic Młodzież Wszechpolska. FX artist Marcin Kaźmierczak is also a supporter of Młodzież Wszechpolska, and of several anti-social justice, anti-gay Facebook pages. (Including a right-wing boycott of a Polish boxer who supports gay rights.)
Despite using registered marks held by the ESRB and Epic’s Unreal Engine attempting to legitimize their project, there is no working relationship between the studio and either organization. In a statement provided to Gamespot, Epic Games stated that “the video is using the trademarked Unreal Engine 4 logo without permission from Epic, and we’ve asked for the removal of our logo from all marketing associated with this product.”
Journalists and commentators alike do the industry a disservice by obfuscating the developer’s racially charged political hate in deference to the otherwise well-trod issue of violence in games. In doing so, they are playing into the exact type of controversy its developers have sought to capitalize on.

…omfg…

LOL, forever branded!

Glenn Greenwald is a Fink and Revisionist

ghost-of-algren:

Glenn Greenwald is a shallow analyst. He’s not capable of doing much more than checking off a list of Constitutional law boxes and pointing to the ways in which the current occupant of the White House comes up short. There’s never any historical analysis of what these boxes signify, how presidential power is legally constructed or developed, that the precious Constitutional restraints GG is always wailing in anguish about being violated for the umpteenth time have always been part of an imperial political technology. To turn a phrase off Greenwald’s latest breathless dispatch, it’s a feature, not a bug.

To properly understand President Obama’s use of military force in Syria, Libya, et al, the drone warfare program, or any other aspect of the president’s use of military force, we need an analysis of presidential power that goes back to before Article II of the Constitution was even drafted. We need to go back to Locke and even Hobbes and also to look at the historical development of the nation state. Then we need to look at the development of US imperialism from Thomas Jefferson setting the nation’s sights on Cuba, to the Monroe Doctrine, the Mexican War, US colonialism in northeast Asia, the Spanish American War, the Banana Republics, and onward into the Cold War and into the current era and the debates about Constitutional law that threaded through all these events. In light of this history, in which military force has frequently, almost casually, used to protect US imperial interests with little or no congressional oversight, Greenwald’s railing against Obama’s “lawlessness” rings hallow.

Greenwald isn’t willing to take his readers through the history of the Imperial Presidency, because Greenwald isn’t interested in historical rigor. He’s interested in presenting readers with an idealized past that we’ve strayed from because of the excesses of whoever’s in the White House at the time of his latest column (past presidencies don’t seem to exist in GG’s analysis, and certainly don’t have any affect on the current one). I’d say it’s a thin cover for him to slip his lowkey capitalist libertarian politics into a discourse liberals and the anti-war left will eat the fuck up, but maybe he’s just stupid. He certainly is in love with the myth of president worship, of Great Men who make fateful decisions that singlehandedly change the course of history without any outside pressures or political limitations affecting their ability to act. It’s a stupid narrative of politics that has no basis in fact.

When we read Greenwald’s caterwauling about Obama’s imperial hubris, we should remember that GG initially supported the unlawful US invasion of Iraq, the most arrogant imperial project of the post-Cold War era which if we’re going to subscribe to GG’s legalistic world view was the single greatest war crime of the 21st century. It was only sometime later that GG became an outspoken critic of unrestrained presidential power. And while his Bush-era columns show a grave concern at the Bush administration’s theory of “Unitary Executive” and right to unilateral conquest, I don’t recall him every ascribing the kind of language of lawlessness to President Bush that he now applies to Obama. Yet was has Obama done but continue the long (150 years at least) tradition that the American president can send in raiding forces to protect US interests whenever and where ever he chooses, so long as raiding forces depart soon there after. But where presidents in the 18 and 19 hundreds sent the Marines, Obama sends drones and F-15s.

Obama has done nothing that two dozen presidents haven’t done before. His so-called “lawlessness” is a direct continuation of a tradition that began more than a century before he was even born. For Greenwald to assign him personal responsibility for the perpetuation of “Endless War” is grotesquely revisionist. If Greenwald were serious about attacking the political machinery of imperial aggression, he might start with some of his own patrons who have personally profited in the hundreds of millions through the very conditions that US military force creates and maintains.

But Greenwald will never do that, because at heart he’s a idealistic capitalist who wants all the benefits of empire, but only if they’re achieved through checking off the boxes on some facile legalistic list of Constitutional precedents. And he knows there’s value to be extracted by attacking the black man in the White House, in ascribing lawlessness and disdain for American tradition to a black man, and fuck if he ain’t going to get his too.

guatepolitics:

nativenews:

guatepolitics:

nativefaces:

Since i keep getting questions on, if the Mayans were only found in mexico. Here’s a visual, these were the regions of the Maya people. 

you mean where Maya peoples were, or where Maya peoples are? 
Above is an English version of a map produced with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas in Guatemala, there are also maps for Mexico and Belize (and there should be for El Salvador and Honduras).
I know settler colonial logics keep telling us Maya peoples are in the past, but Maya peoples are also in the present. And the future.
In Guatemala alone, there are 21 legally recognized living Maya peoples, as well as the non-Maya indigenous Xinca and the [non-Maya indigenous] African Diaspora Garífuna.

The Garifuna are also a Native American indigenous peoples, as well as being part of the African diaspora. Please do not neglect to mention this, as erasure of their American indigeneity is one of the tactics actively implemented by the Latin American governments such as Honduras to displace them from the lands that they have been inhabiting for hundreds of years. They are one of several groups from the Caribbean, and their language is one of the Maipurean language family.

Seems like I was unclear about this in the first round? (bolded the important part in commentary and my edit above)
The reason why I mentioned the Xinca and Garífuna peoples is because it is common in Guatemala to assume that “indigenous” means “Maya.” That is wrong.
The Guatemalan constitution recognizes both Xinca and Garífuna as indigenous peoples. (They are not Maya, but they are indigenous.)
This is important because:
1) Amongst the 21 different Maya peoples that the state recognizes (so, highly political), they speak different languages, have different religious practices and really different ontologies. You really can’t know much about Q’eqchi’ territoriality by reading the *many* ethnographies on K’iche’s* or Kaqchikels. So “Maya” can sometimes just mean “indigenous Other,” or it can be a way for people to forge solidarities. Sometimes it’s both.
2) Guatemala is a signatory to ILO 169, so the Xinca, Garífuna, and each of the 21 Maya peoples have legal rights to territorial autonomy. (de jure at least; de facto not so much)
——-
*I think maybe Irma Alicia Velázquez Nimatuj (who is K’iche’) may spell this with two e’s at the end? I’m not sure, so I’m just going with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas, but let me know….

Can we also talk about the ”indigenous diaspora” that exists in the US?
For example: http://www.scpr.org/news/2011/10/26/29579/coachella-farm-workers-live-favelas/

“It’s no accident these communities are suffering,” said Beaman, with California Rural Legal Assistance. “It comes with being 97 percent Latino, 50 percent undocumented and 100 percent working class. It’s a snapshot of how certain categories of people are forced to live differently based on their perceived power.”
Widespread panic about park closures prompted thousands of residents, including many indigenous native-speaking Purépecha people from the highlands of Michoacán in Mexico, to move their trailers onto sovereign tribal land, away from code enforcers as well as U.S. immigration agents.
The denouement was the housing apocalypse known as Duroville, a postcard of squalor and lawlessness in which packs of wild dogs roamed muddy alleyways and raw sewage puddled along Michael Street, Marylou Avenue and other byways named for owner Harvey Duro’s family.

http://www.theyucatantimes.com/2013/11/maya-baseball-team-in-san-francisco-ca-passion-for-the-sport-and-proud-of-their-roots/

“Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization. It’s a culture that is becoming increasingly visible in the United States, where hundreds of thousands of Mayas now live.
Baseball, says Perez, provides a way for Maya immigrants in the U.S. to stay connected with community, display cultural pride and establish their unique place within the Latino Diaspora. “It is almost like an underground movement.”
Today, a growing but untold number of Yucateco baseball teams are scattered across the state of California – there are even whole leagues here whose rosters are mostly made up of Yucatecos.”Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization.

guatepolitics:

nativenews:

guatepolitics:

nativefaces:

Since i keep getting questions on, if the Mayans were only found in mexico. Here’s a visual, these were the regions of the Maya people. 

you mean where Maya peoples were, or where Maya peoples areLiving Maya Map

Above is an English version of a map produced with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas in Guatemala, there are also maps for Mexico and Belize (and there should be for El Salvador and Honduras).

I know settler colonial logics keep telling us Maya peoples are in the past, but Maya peoples are also in the present. And the future.

In Guatemala alone, there are 21 legally recognized living Maya peoples, as well as the non-Maya indigenous Xinca and the [non-Maya indigenous] African Diaspora Garífuna.

The Garifuna are also a Native American indigenous peoples, as well as being part of the African diaspora. Please do not neglect to mention this, as erasure of their American indigeneity is one of the tactics actively implemented by the Latin American governments such as Honduras to displace them from the lands that they have been inhabiting for hundreds of years. They are one of several groups from the Caribbean, and their language is one of the Maipurean language family.

Seems like I was unclear about this in the first round? (bolded the important part in commentary and my edit above)

The reason why I mentioned the Xinca and Garífuna peoples is because it is common in Guatemala to assume that “indigenous” means “Maya.” That is wrong.

The Guatemalan constitution recognizes both Xinca and Garífuna as indigenous peoples. (They are not Maya, but they are indigenous.)

This is important because:

1) Amongst the 21 different Maya peoples that the state recognizes (so, highly political), they speak different languages, have different religious practices and really different ontologies. You really can’t know much about Q’eqchi’ territoriality by reading the *many* ethnographies on K’iche’s* or Kaqchikels. So “Maya” can sometimes just mean “indigenous Other,” or it can be a way for people to forge solidarities. Sometimes it’s both.

2) Guatemala is a signatory to ILO 169, so the Xinca, Garífuna, and each of the 21 Maya peoples have legal rights to territorial autonomy. (de jure at least; de facto not so much)

——-

*I think maybe Irma Alicia Velázquez Nimatuj (who is K’iche’) may spell this with two e’s at the end? I’m not sure, so I’m just going with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas, but let me know….

Can we also talk about the ”indigenous diaspora” that exists in the US?

For example: http://www.scpr.org/news/2011/10/26/29579/coachella-farm-workers-live-favelas/

“It’s no accident these communities are suffering,” said Beaman, with California Rural Legal Assistance. “It comes with being 97 percent Latino, 50 percent undocumented and 100 percent working class. It’s a snapshot of how certain categories of people are forced to live differently based on their perceived power.”

Widespread panic about park closures prompted thousands of residents, including many indigenous native-speaking Purépecha people from the highlands of Michoacán in Mexico, to move their trailers onto sovereign tribal land, away from code enforcers as well as U.S. immigration agents.

The denouement was the housing apocalypse known as Duroville, a postcard of squalor and lawlessness in which packs of wild dogs roamed muddy alleyways and raw sewage puddled along Michael Street, Marylou Avenue and other byways named for owner Harvey Duro’s family.

http://www.theyucatantimes.com/2013/11/maya-baseball-team-in-san-francisco-ca-passion-for-the-sport-and-proud-of-their-roots/

Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization. It’s a culture that is becoming increasingly visible in the United States, where hundreds of thousands of Mayas now live.

Baseball, says Perez, provides a way for Maya immigrants in the U.S. to stay connected with community, display cultural pride and establish their unique place within the Latino Diaspora. “It is almost like an underground movement.”

Today, a growing but untold number of Yucateco baseball teams are scattered across the state of California – there are even whole leagues here whose rosters are mostly made up of Yucatecos.”Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization.

ghost-of-algren:

remember when there was only one US ebola case and all the nerds were saying how there wasn’t going to be an outbreak because of how great our health system is.

where are those fucking geeks now that two patients (so far) have contracted ebola due to avoidable medical error.

neomexicanismos:

Monumentos sagrados

neomexicanismos:

Monumentos sagrados

Mi reseño del Supersónico Festival para Panamérika.

You’ll eat tacos, celebrate “drinko de mayo”, and do sugar skulls whenever you can

goodmorningshipwreck:

but you won’t let a man sell oranges on the side of the road to feed his family.