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Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9-4k_Mv2ss

Me parece que cambiaron las letras de “canta y no llores” a “Aaaand-reeees Guardadooooo.” Holandeses que no ódio!!

RECOGNIZE!!!

guatepolitics:

nativenews:

guatepolitics:

nativefaces:

Since i keep getting questions on, if the Mayans were only found in mexico. Here’s a visual, these were the regions of the Maya people. 

you mean where Maya peoples were, or where Maya peoples are? 
Above is an English version of a map produced with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas in Guatemala, there are also maps for Mexico and Belize (and there should be for El Salvador and Honduras).
I know settler colonial logics keep telling us Maya peoples are in the past, but Maya peoples are also in the present. And the future.
In Guatemala alone, there are 21 legally recognized living Maya peoples, as well as the non-Maya indigenous Xinca and the [non-Maya indigenous] African Diaspora Garífuna.

The Garifuna are also a Native American indigenous peoples, as well as being part of the African diaspora. Please do not neglect to mention this, as erasure of their American indigeneity is one of the tactics actively implemented by the Latin American governments such as Honduras to displace them from the lands that they have been inhabiting for hundreds of years. They are one of several groups from the Caribbean, and their language is one of the Maipurean language family.

Seems like I was unclear about this in the first round? (bolded the important part in commentary and my edit above)
The reason why I mentioned the Xinca and Garífuna peoples is because it is common in Guatemala to assume that “indigenous” means “Maya.” That is wrong.
The Guatemalan constitution recognizes both Xinca and Garífuna as indigenous peoples. (They are not Maya, but they are indigenous.)
This is important because:
1) Amongst the 21 different Maya peoples that the state recognizes (so, highly political), they speak different languages, have different religious practices and really different ontologies. You really can’t know much about Q’eqchi’ territoriality by reading the *many* ethnographies on K’iche’s* or Kaqchikels. So “Maya” can sometimes just mean “indigenous Other,” or it can be a way for people to forge solidarities. Sometimes it’s both.
2) Guatemala is a signatory to ILO 169, so the Xinca, Garífuna, and each of the 21 Maya peoples have legal rights to territorial autonomy. (de jure at least; de facto not so much)
——-
*I think maybe Irma Alicia Velázquez Nimatuj (who is K’iche’) may spell this with two e’s at the end? I’m not sure, so I’m just going with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas, but let me know….

Can we also talk about the ”indigenous diaspora” that exists in the US?
For example: http://www.scpr.org/news/2011/10/26/29579/coachella-farm-workers-live-favelas/

“It’s no accident these communities are suffering,” said Beaman, with California Rural Legal Assistance. “It comes with being 97 percent Latino, 50 percent undocumented and 100 percent working class. It’s a snapshot of how certain categories of people are forced to live differently based on their perceived power.”
Widespread panic about park closures prompted thousands of residents, including many indigenous native-speaking Purépecha people from the highlands of Michoacán in Mexico, to move their trailers onto sovereign tribal land, away from code enforcers as well as U.S. immigration agents.
The denouement was the housing apocalypse known as Duroville, a postcard of squalor and lawlessness in which packs of wild dogs roamed muddy alleyways and raw sewage puddled along Michael Street, Marylou Avenue and other byways named for owner Harvey Duro’s family.

http://www.theyucatantimes.com/2013/11/maya-baseball-team-in-san-francisco-ca-passion-for-the-sport-and-proud-of-their-roots/

“Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization. It’s a culture that is becoming increasingly visible in the United States, where hundreds of thousands of Mayas now live.
Baseball, says Perez, provides a way for Maya immigrants in the U.S. to stay connected with community, display cultural pride and establish their unique place within the Latino Diaspora. “It is almost like an underground movement.”
Today, a growing but untold number of Yucateco baseball teams are scattered across the state of California – there are even whole leagues here whose rosters are mostly made up of Yucatecos.”Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization.

guatepolitics:

nativenews:

guatepolitics:

nativefaces:

Since i keep getting questions on, if the Mayans were only found in mexico. Here’s a visual, these were the regions of the Maya people. 

you mean where Maya peoples were, or where Maya peoples areLiving Maya Map

Above is an English version of a map produced with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas in Guatemala, there are also maps for Mexico and Belize (and there should be for El Salvador and Honduras).

I know settler colonial logics keep telling us Maya peoples are in the past, but Maya peoples are also in the present. And the future.

In Guatemala alone, there are 21 legally recognized living Maya peoples, as well as the non-Maya indigenous Xinca and the [non-Maya indigenous] African Diaspora Garífuna.

The Garifuna are also a Native American indigenous peoples, as well as being part of the African diaspora. Please do not neglect to mention this, as erasure of their American indigeneity is one of the tactics actively implemented by the Latin American governments such as Honduras to displace them from the lands that they have been inhabiting for hundreds of years. They are one of several groups from the Caribbean, and their language is one of the Maipurean language family.

Seems like I was unclear about this in the first round? (bolded the important part in commentary and my edit above)

The reason why I mentioned the Xinca and Garífuna peoples is because it is common in Guatemala to assume that “indigenous” means “Maya.” That is wrong.

The Guatemalan constitution recognizes both Xinca and Garífuna as indigenous peoples. (They are not Maya, but they are indigenous.)

This is important because:

1) Amongst the 21 different Maya peoples that the state recognizes (so, highly political), they speak different languages, have different religious practices and really different ontologies. You really can’t know much about Q’eqchi’ territoriality by reading the *many* ethnographies on K’iche’s* or Kaqchikels. So “Maya” can sometimes just mean “indigenous Other,” or it can be a way for people to forge solidarities. Sometimes it’s both.

2) Guatemala is a signatory to ILO 169, so the Xinca, Garífuna, and each of the 21 Maya peoples have legal rights to territorial autonomy. (de jure at least; de facto not so much)

——-

*I think maybe Irma Alicia Velázquez Nimatuj (who is K’iche’) may spell this with two e’s at the end? I’m not sure, so I’m just going with the Academia de Lenguas Mayas, but let me know….

Can we also talk about the ”indigenous diaspora” that exists in the US?

For example: http://www.scpr.org/news/2011/10/26/29579/coachella-farm-workers-live-favelas/

“It’s no accident these communities are suffering,” said Beaman, with California Rural Legal Assistance. “It comes with being 97 percent Latino, 50 percent undocumented and 100 percent working class. It’s a snapshot of how certain categories of people are forced to live differently based on their perceived power.”

Widespread panic about park closures prompted thousands of residents, including many indigenous native-speaking Purépecha people from the highlands of Michoacán in Mexico, to move their trailers onto sovereign tribal land, away from code enforcers as well as U.S. immigration agents.

The denouement was the housing apocalypse known as Duroville, a postcard of squalor and lawlessness in which packs of wild dogs roamed muddy alleyways and raw sewage puddled along Michael Street, Marylou Avenue and other byways named for owner Harvey Duro’s family.

http://www.theyucatantimes.com/2013/11/maya-baseball-team-in-san-francisco-ca-passion-for-the-sport-and-proud-of-their-roots/

Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization. It’s a culture that is becoming increasingly visible in the United States, where hundreds of thousands of Mayas now live.

Baseball, says Perez, provides a way for Maya immigrants in the U.S. to stay connected with community, display cultural pride and establish their unique place within the Latino Diaspora. “It is almost like an underground movement.”

Today, a growing but untold number of Yucateco baseball teams are scattered across the state of California – there are even whole leagues here whose rosters are mostly made up of Yucatecos.”Baseball is an important element of Mayan culture,” says Alberto Perez, director of Asociación MAYAB, a Bay Area Yucatec Maya organization.

IGUALA, Mexico — STUDENT protesters in rural Mexico have long dealt with heavy-handed police officers. But on the black night of Sept. 26, students who attended a rural teachers’ college realized they were facing a far worse menace in this southern city. Not only were police officers shooting haphazardly at them, killing three students and several passers-by; shady gunmen were also firing from the sidelines.

The next morning, the corpse of a student was dumped on a major street. He’d had his skin peeled off and his eyes gouged out. It was the mark of drug cartel assassins.

Soldiers and federal detectives detained two alleged cartel hit men, who confessed they had conspired with the police to murder students. They led troops to pits on the outskirts of Iguala containing 28 charred corpses. Forensic teams are working to identify the bodies. A total of 43 students went missing that night, many last seen being bundled into police cars.

When I went to the grave site on an eerie hill, it still stank of decaying human flesh. I had just been interviewing some of the students’ classmates at their university, mostly teenage sons of poor farmers, who are idealistic, committed and frightened. I have covered cartel violence in Mexico for over a decade. But as I inhaled the stench of death on that hill, and saw photos of the mutilated student on the road, I felt as never before that I was covering an act of pure unadulterated evil.

Why drug cartels want to slaughter students may at first seem inexplicable. But it is a symptom of a systematic process that has been taking place in Mexico for years. Drug cartels are taking over chunks of government apparatus, from local police forces to city and state governments. Sometimes, they control the officials; other times, cartel members themselves are the officials. I call it state capture. A student I talked to had a more visceral term for it: narco-politica, or narco-politics.

One measure of the impact of transnational corporate power is that the traditional community system that once distributed nearly all of the country’s food now has just 22 percent of that market. Self-sustaining capital flows that once supported community social cohesion are now redirected toward the United States — and into the pockets of the corporation that exemplifies contemporary wage slavery.

Corporate reorganization of the food system coincided with the undermining of the ejido system of publicly owned but individually farmed plots. Salinas changed the ejido regulations to permit the sale of the communal land. Meanwhile, NAFTA destroyed small-scale agriculture in Mexico by allowing US agribusiness to dump subsidized corn in Mexico. That Salinas equated his reforms with the revolutionary principle of agrarian redistribution only showed how cynical the country’s elite could be about using nationalist myths to pander to the public.

Then there was Telmex, which, according to a 2006 article, still controls “94% of land lines, 78% of cell phone service and 70% of the internet market.” When the country’s telephone company became a private monopoly, rather than a public utility, it may not have solved the system’s technical problems. But it did make the new owner, Carlos Slim, one of the richest men in the world. His brother, Julian Slim, served the elite’s power structure as a police officer in Mexico City, beating and torturing communists. Neoliberal Mexico: a Mafioso political economy at its finest.

Finally, and most recently, the string of neoliberal reforms reached their culmination this summer with the partial privatization of PEMEX, the country’s nationalized petroleum company. The National Action Party (PAN), a conservative party with historical links to fascism, has long had this goal, but settled for creating legal loopholes to give the private sector, domestic and foreign, access to contracts with PEMEX. As a sign of how things will go now, we have the recent news that Fox’s stepchildren are under investigation for corrupt practices in business dealings with the petroleum-services company, Oceanografía.

Quest for the Lost Maya

class-struggle-anarchism:

Just reading about the lengths Chinese people went to to gain entry to the United States during the period of their exclusion - apparently there was a Chinese Mexican called Jose Chang who made a good living helping Chinese people “pass” as Mexicans.  It’s really fascinating how people found ways of circumventing these absurd rules over human movement… also says a lot that the immigration officials apparently found it “impossible” to tell the difference between Chinese people and Mexicans. Mexican immigration into the US was fundamentally unrestricted at this time, but there was mass hysteria over Chinese immigration, even though Chinese labour was in massive demand and businesses were complaining that they had to turn down contracts because they could get enough Chinese workers. Goes to show how the interests of the racist state and capital don’t always align.
source: Erika Lee, At America’s gates: Chinese immigration during the exclusion era

class-struggle-anarchism:

Just reading about the lengths Chinese people went to to gain entry to the United States during the period of their exclusion - apparently there was a Chinese Mexican called Jose Chang who made a good living helping Chinese people “pass” as Mexicans.  It’s really fascinating how people found ways of circumventing these absurd rules over human movement… also says a lot that the immigration officials apparently found it “impossible” to tell the difference between Chinese people and Mexicans. Mexican immigration into the US was fundamentally unrestricted at this time, but there was mass hysteria over Chinese immigration, even though Chinese labour was in massive demand and businesses were complaining that they had to turn down contracts because they could get enough Chinese workers. Goes to show how the interests of the racist state and capital don’t always align.

source: Erika Lee, At America’s gates: Chinese immigration during the exclusion era

afroxander:

VS. Chile, Bolivia:

Porteros: Guillermo Ochoa (Málaga), Alfredo Talavera (Toluca).

Defensas: Luis Venegas (Atlas), Oswaldo Alanís (Santos), Paul Aguilar (América), Rodolfo Pizarro (Pachuca), Francisco Rodríguez (América), Carlos Salcido (Chivas) y Miguel Herrera (Pachuca).

Mediocampistas: Héctor Herrera (Porto), Javier Aquino (Rayo Vallecano), Andrés Guardado (PSV) y José Juan Vázquez (León).

Delanteros: Oribe Peralta (Santos), Erick Torres (Chivas USA), Giovani dos Santos (Villarreal), Javier Orozco (Santos) y Marco Fabián (Cruz azul).

Lista final:

11 de Agosto, 2012:  Mexico vence a Brasil 2 - 1 en el final de futbol de las Olimpiadas de Londres.

Primer gol de Mexico con narracion de Andres Cantor.

Segundo gol de Mexico con narracion de Andres Cantor.

viva

viva

August 4th, 1999 - Confederations Cup final: Mexico 4 - 3 Brazil