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thinkmexican:

Mexico Beats US 3-1, Wins 12th U-20 Title
Mexico won its 12th U-20 CONCACAF title against the United States, beating them 3-1 in overtime.
Jesús Corona scored early on an aggressive charge to give Mexico the lead at minute 4’. However, a controversial call allowed Benji Joya to tie the game with a penalty kick only minutes later.
In overtime, it was a repeat of the 2011 U-17 World Cup with Julio Gómez scoring with a chilena to give Mexico the lead. Jorge Espericueta sealed the 3-1 win with a penalty kick in the 113th minute.
Photo: NoticiasMVS

thinkmexican:

Mexico Beats US 3-1, Wins 12th U-20 Title

Mexico won its 12th U-20 CONCACAF title against the United States, beating them 3-1 in overtime.

Jesús Corona scored early on an aggressive charge to give Mexico the lead at minute 4’. However, a controversial call allowed Benji Joya to tie the game with a penalty kick only minutes later.

In overtime, it was a repeat of the 2011 U-17 World Cup with Julio Gómez scoring with a chilena to give Mexico the lead. Jorge Espericueta sealed the 3-1 win with a penalty kick in the 113th minute.

Photo: NoticiasMVS

thesmithian:


…a gripping analytical narrative of U.S. state policing of ethnic Mexicans in the far west Texas and the New Mexico borderlands from 1893 and 1933. While the “when” in the title refers to the critical years of growing U.S. immigration controls and Prohibition, it is more accurate to say that the book examines how border people’s perceived transgressions against Anglo authority linked the Mexican community with criminal activity in the minds of officials in Austin and Washington.

more.

thesmithian:

…a gripping analytical narrative of U.S. state policing of ethnic Mexicans in the far west Texas and the New Mexico borderlands from 1893 and 1933. While the “when” in the title refers to the critical years of growing U.S. immigration controls and Prohibition, it is more accurate to say that the book examines how border people’s perceived transgressions against Anglo authority linked the Mexican community with criminal activity in the minds of officials in Austin and Washington.

more.

thinkmexican:



What the Fuck Is NAFTA?
Since it was first introduced in 1994, NAFTA has been opposed by labor and student organizations in Mexico, the US, and Canada, the three signatories to this ‘agreement.’
Roughly, NAFTA is an economic law that deregulates capital movement through all three countries. It gives corporations the freedom to move entire operations untaxed, the ability to arbitrate as if they were citizens from those respective countries and, ultimately, the power to dictate the economy. For example, if Intel decides it is cheaper to manufacture processors in a facility in Guadalajara, NAFTA allows them to do so unopposed by the US government. It does not matter that this corporate freedom kills the Mexican IT sector, NAFTA is the law.
When Intel operates in Mexico, the Mexican government is forced to treat Intel as a Mexican corporation and affords them the same right to property as state enterprises. Intel is also not required to pay tariff dues as they used to be decades ago and, in fact, it receives subsidies from the Mexican government. This has effects the Mexican population through diminished tariff revenue for public services and infrastructure, a neoliberal trend present in all three countries.
NAFTA basically dictates that all three governments support corporate control of the economy.
The effects of NAFTA are also felt across economic sectors. For example, the movement of automobile manufacturing to Mexico, where labor laws are rarely enforced, has left large areas of the midwestern United States desolate; the area is referred to as the ‘rust-belt’ due to its abandoned manufacturing facilities.
Mexico’s maquiladoras, then, are obviously no good for Mexicans because they are economic production used to undercut the US worker. The way to undercut US workers is to neglect labor rights somewhere else. As a result, workers living on either side of the border are made more ‘competitive’ but competition within the NAFTA framework is narrowly defined as a demeanor and capacity to work for more time with less pay. NAFTA formally imposes a ‘race to the bottom’ as all workers are forced to participate in an economic competition they cannot possibly survive.
Through NAFTA, US corporations also manipulate the agricultural sector of Mexico. Remember, Mexico is still largely agrarian and many people survive through their own small scale farming operations. US corporations destroy this capacity by exporting lower quality products to Mexican firms and do so with the political protection and subsidies from the US government.
Monsanto, for instance, owns many acres of farm land and receives a federal subsidy for every bushel of corn planted regardless of quality. The subsidy is also given despite it being well known that Monsanto has near monopolistic control over corn and is consolidating control over publicly subsidized research in US universities as well. Monsanto’s federally subsidized corn is dumped into Mexico where Monsanto ‘fixes’ the price of maize - Monsanto and its Mexican subsidiaries raise the price of corn based products at will.
The effect is obvious: In Mexico, tortillas, corn and corn maize have all increased in price. Smaller farming operations are now unviable which displaces Mexican workers, forcing them to seek work in the United States.
Submitted by Ricardo Lezama

thinkmexican:

What the Fuck Is NAFTA?

Since it was first introduced in 1994, NAFTA has been opposed by labor and student organizations in Mexico, the US, and Canada, the three signatories to this ‘agreement.’

Roughly, NAFTA is an economic law that deregulates capital movement through all three countries. It gives corporations the freedom to move entire operations untaxed, the ability to arbitrate as if they were citizens from those respective countries and, ultimately, the power to dictate the economy. For example, if Intel decides it is cheaper to manufacture processors in a facility in Guadalajara, NAFTA allows them to do so unopposed by the US government. It does not matter that this corporate freedom kills the Mexican IT sector, NAFTA is the law.

When Intel operates in Mexico, the Mexican government is forced to treat Intel as a Mexican corporation and affords them the same right to property as state enterprises. Intel is also not required to pay tariff dues as they used to be decades ago and, in fact, it receives subsidies from the Mexican government. This has effects the Mexican population through diminished tariff revenue for public services and infrastructure, a neoliberal trend present in all three countries.

NAFTA basically dictates that all three governments support corporate control of the economy.

The effects of NAFTA are also felt across economic sectors. For example, the movement of automobile manufacturing to Mexico, where labor laws are rarely enforced, has left large areas of the midwestern United States desolate; the area is referred to as the ‘rust-belt’ due to its abandoned manufacturing facilities.

Mexico’s maquiladoras, then, are obviously no good for Mexicans because they are economic production used to undercut the US worker. The way to undercut US workers is to neglect labor rights somewhere else. As a result, workers living on either side of the border are made more ‘competitive’ but competition within the NAFTA framework is narrowly defined as a demeanor and capacity to work for more time with less pay. NAFTA formally imposes a ‘race to the bottom’ as all workers are forced to participate in an economic competition they cannot possibly survive.

Through NAFTA, US corporations also manipulate the agricultural sector of Mexico. Remember, Mexico is still largely agrarian and many people survive through their own small scale farming operations. US corporations destroy this capacity by exporting lower quality products to Mexican firms and do so with the political protection and subsidies from the US government.

Monsanto, for instance, owns many acres of farm land and receives a federal subsidy for every bushel of corn planted regardless of quality. The subsidy is also given despite it being well known that Monsanto has near monopolistic control over corn and is consolidating control over publicly subsidized research in US universities as well. Monsanto’s federally subsidized corn is dumped into Mexico where Monsanto ‘fixes’ the price of maize - Monsanto and its Mexican subsidiaries raise the price of corn based products at will.

The effect is obvious: In Mexico, tortillas, corn and corn maize have all increased in price. Smaller farming operations are now unviable which displaces Mexican workers, forcing them to seek work in the United States.

Submitted by Ricardo Lezama

By Andres Oppenheimer for the Miami Herald

When Doral made history by becoming the first Florida city to elect a Venezuelan mayor earlier this week, my first reaction was to run to my Twitter page to spread the news alongside a short comment: Gracias, Hugo!

Just as Florida should extend eternal gratitude to Cuba’s dictator, Fidel Castro, for the tens of thousands of middle-class professionals who fled to Miami after the 1959 Cuban revolution, Florida authorities should erect a statue to Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez for triggering the flight of a good chunk of Venezuela’s middle class over the past decade.

There are an estimated 244,000 Venezuelans living in the United States, up from about 91,000 in 2000, a year after Chávez took office, according to U.S. Census figures. Doral has the largest concentration of Venezuelans in the United States, prompting many of its residents to refer to it jokingly as “Doralzuela.”

Perhaps more interestingly, a majority of Venezuelans in the United States are highly educated. Among Venezuelan-American residents aged 25 to 34, nearly 57 percent have bachelor’s or master’s degrees, much more than the U.S. national average, according to the 2010 Census figures.

While some Venezuelans came before Chávez was first elected, many have reached top positions in the U.S. academic world. Ironically, while not one single Venezuelan university is currently listed in the Times Higher Education Supplement ranking of the world’s best 400 universities, a Venezuelan academic — Rafael Reif — was appointed earlier this year as president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one of the world’s five highest-ranked universities. Many other Venezuelans are teaching at Harvard, Columbia and other top U.S. schools.

The mass exodus of middle-class and professional Venezuelans in recent years also has been a boon to Miami’s real estate industry. Venezuelans, as well as Brazilians and Argentines, have been among the main buyers of houses and apartments following the 2008 housing crisis.

Not surprisingly, a recent Miami Herald story quoted Philip Spiegelman, principal of the International Sales Group, a Miami condominium marketing firm, as saying that the joke of the day at a Nov. 15 real estate conference in Miami was that Chávez should be named “Salesman of the Year” because of the high numbers of Venezuelans who purchased real estate in Miami this year.

In a telephone interview, Luigi Boria, Doral’s new mayor, told me that Venezuelans make up about 22 percent of Doral’s residents.

Boria, a businessman who owns a computer export firm, moved to Florida in 1989, but most Venezuelan residents of Doral arrived more recently.

“They have come because of the persecution, the fear and insecurity they feel in Venezuela,” Boria says. “And many more are likely to come in the near future. My own brother and his family are talking with immigration attorneys and trying to move here.”

Much the same exodus of middle and upper-class Venezuelans is aimed toward Panama, Colombia, and other Latin American countries, where the Venezuelan diaspora is growing by the day. There are at least 97,000 Venezuelans living in Spain, 37,000 in Italy and 36,000 in Portugal, according to the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

As a result of the flight of Venezuelan oil executives and engineers, Venezuela’s oil production has plummeted from 3.4 million barrels a day when Chávez took office to about 2.5 million barrels today, according to independent industry estimates. Much like what happened with Cuba’s sugar industry after the 1959 Cuban Revolution, Venezuela’s oil industry has been decimated by the outflow of human capital.

My opinion: Venezuela’s populist fiesta — in which Chávez has won reelection thanks to giving away his country’s oil bonanza in cash subsidies to millions of people, while at the same time destroying the economy and killing the country’s industries — is resulting in a mass exodus of talented professionals. The trend will haunt Venezuela for years to come.

But for the United States, Spain, Panama and other countries that are receiving this pool of highly-skilled and often wealthy immigrants, it’s a blessing. President Barack Obama could use the occasion of Boria’s election as the first Venezuelan-born mayor in Florida to send a heartfelt “thank-you” note to Chávez.

Obama plans to discuss a broad range of issues during an Oval Office meeting on November 27, it said in a statement.

"The president welcomes the opportunity to underscore the shared values and strong bonds of friendship between the United States and Mexico,” the White House said.

Pena Nieto will bring Mexico’s Institutional Revolutionary Party back to power after 12 years on the sidelines when he takes office December 1. He has pledged to push for major economic reforms, including overhauls of energy and tax laws.

The two are likely to discuss anti-drug policies, as Latin American countries have begun to question the effectiveness of the four-decade U.S. war on drugs.

Mexico, given its size, proximity to the United States, and status as a prime battleground for drug-related violence, will play a key role in that debate.

Trade is also a likely agenda item, as the Obama administration seeks to expand business opportunities for U.S. firms in Mexico and the region.

I added the “ñ” in the headline. It originally read Enrique Pena Nieto…which does sound pretty accurate anyway, hehehe.

deeannao5:

“Dia de muertos” (day of the dead) @ the Mexico-US Border in Mexicali BC Mexico border with Calexico CA US.

deeannao5:

“Dia de muertos” (day of the dead) @ the Mexico-US Border in Mexicali BC Mexico border with Calexico CA US.

How an Accused Guatemalan War Criminal Won U.S., Canadian Citizenship

Via ProPublica:

In May 1985, a Guatemalan Army lieutenant named Jorge Vinicio Sosa Orantes deserted, flew to San Francisco and requested political asylum, asserting that leftist guerrillas in his war-torn homeland were gunning for him.

The 27-year-old officer described his combat exploits in his application for asylum. He said he had served as an instructor in the elite “Kaibil” commandos and as a “commanding officer” in Guatemala’s bloody civil war.

"It is impossible for me and family to return as we have been sentenced to death due to my participation in the various combats in the conflictive area," he wrote in his asylum application.

Immigration officials rejected his request, but Sosa sought asylum in Canada and became a citizen there. He eventually returned to the United States and became a U.S. citizen as well.

Recently, Sosa’s odyssey took an extraordinary turn. The self-proclaimed refugee stands accused of committing mass murder in uniform. Last month, Canada extradited him to Los Angeles to face trial on charges related to one of the worst war crimes in the recent history of the Americas. He had fled north after prosecutors charged him with lying on immigration forms to conceal his alleged role in the slaughter of more than 250 people in the village of Dos Erres in 1982.

Historian William Blum recently documented that, since 1945, the US has attempted to overthrow more than 50 governments, has grossly interfered in democratic elections in at least 30 countries and has dropped bombs on the people of more than 30 others.

Passage to Ecuador: Chomsky, Assange, sham justice, sham democracies. (via London Progressive Journal)

Iraq has been torn to pieces by sectarianism since the US invasion and occupation, Libya is in turmoil in the aftermath of NATO intervention, Pakistan is being destabilised and a proxy war is being stoked by the US and its allies in Syria.

Filed under: Not surprised.

(via mehreenkasana)

They don’t hate us ‘cause we’re free. They hate us ‘cause we invaded their countries, gave their governments to the guys who promised to give us commodities, then sucked their land dry of any natural resources. Oh, and then tried to kill the people who tried to get their countries back.

And now there’s anywhere from two to four generations of people who hate the US for reasons we don’t even want to acknowledge, and they may not even have been taught.

But yeah. ‘Murica.

(via dontbearuiner)

Anyone who is interested in this phenomenon of American interference should read Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq by Stephen Kinzer.  It’s as fascinating and informative as it is horrifying.

(via airspaniel)

spanishyeah:

At a time of heated and divisive debate over immigration, the new feature-length documentary, “Harvest of Empire,” examines the direct connection between the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin America and the immigration crisis we face today. Based on the groundbreaking book by award-winning journalist and Democracy Now! co-host Juan González, “Harvest of Empire” takes an unflinching look at the role that U.S. economic and military interests played in triggering an unprecedented wave of migration that is transforming our nation’s cultural and economic landscape. González is a columnist at the New York Daily News and author of three other books, including “News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media.” We’re also joined by the film’s co-director, Eduardo López

Juan Gonzalez is the MAN!